Sunday, November 19, 2017

MYANMAR MASSACRE - BUDDHISTS BURNING CHILDREN ALIVE


                              Image result for rohingya children burned alive


Discarded and left for dead, Mumtaz says she found herself on top of a mound of charred, entangled bodies.

"They killed and killed and piled the bodies up high. It was like cut bamboo," says Mumtaz, a Rohingya woman from the village of Tula Toli in western Myanmar.

"In the pile there was someone's neck, someone's head, someone's leg. I was able to come out, I don't know how."

The horrors Mumtaz says she endured didn't stop there. After escaping the mass grave, Mumtaz says she was dragged to a village house and raped by soldiers. The wooden house was then locked and set on fire.

It was her seven-year-old daughter Razia, who was in the hut, that ultimately saved her.

"I called to my mum. And my mum said, 'who are you?,'" Razia says. "My mother's head was split. She was thrown aside. They struck me and threw me aside."

"I said 'your finger is on fire.' Then my mum and I got out and left."

The pair squeezed through a damaged part of a fence and hid in a vegetable patch, before other villagers found them and helped them get to Bangladesh, where a staggering 615,000 Rohingya refugees have fled since August 25, according to aid agencies.

The refugees have escaped violent clashes in the north of Rakhine State, where Myanmar's military has intensified what it calls "clearance operations" targeting "terrorists" after Rohingya militants attacked police posts, killing 12 security officials.

The UN calls what's happening in Rakhine a "textbook example of ethnic cleansing" and the killings that took place in Mumtaz's village on August 30 have been described as one of the worst atrocities of the past two and a half months.

Shafiur Rahman, a Bangladeshi-British documentary maker, first heard about what occurred at Tula Toli after he filmed a group of Rohingya crossing the border between Myanmar and Bangladesh on September 2, three days after the killings.

The dramatic footage shows dozens of men and women clambering across barbed wire fences into no man's land, some of them covered in blood and carrying dead or injured relatives. Their distress is palpable.

"It quickly became clear to me that those telling me the most horrific accounts of their last few days were those coming from Tula Toli," Rahman tells CNN. "And what also struck me was the consistency in their stories."

Mumtaz fled from Myanmar with her daughter. 

He met Mumtaz and Razia in Bangladesh in late September. Almost mummified in bandages, Mumtaz had spent 15 days bed- bound in a clinic, unable to speak or even sip a glass of water. By mid-October, the horrific burns all over her face and body started to slowly heal, and Mumtaz began to share her story with Rahman in a series of interviews.

Accounts of mass rape, murder and arson have been given by many of the hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees who have escaped Myanmar.

But the testimonies Rahman has collected from a total of 30 Tula Toli residents over the past two months, and detailed in this report depict what Amnesty International describes in an October report as "what appears to be one of the worst atrocities of the Army's ethnic cleansing campaign."

"Amnesty International believes, based on consistent, corroborating witness accounts, that soldiers massacred at least scores of Rohingya women, men, and children from Min Gyi on 30 August," the Amnesty report concludes. Min Gyi is another name for Tula Toli.

One of Myanmar's poorest regions, Rakhine State is home to the mostly Muslim Rohingya and the Rakhines, a predominantly Buddhist ethnic group. The two have lived side by side in Tula Toli for generations although long-simmering tensions have often erupted into violence in the region. The estimated 1.1 million Rohingya have been denied citizenship in Myanmar, which regards them as Bengali.

Bangladesh insists they are from Myanmar, rendering them effectively stateless.
In detailed video interviews and conversations, most of the 30 survivors told Rahman that they were given assurances by local officials that they would be safe if they remained in their village.

Mohammed Nasir said he was told: "They might torch the houses, but they won't kill anyone."

Residents describe helicopters landing near the village at 8 a.m. on the morning of August 30. The soldiers were joined by around 50 Rakhine Buddhists and other non-Rohingya minorities from outside the village, survivors said.

"They asked us to gather on the beach," Nasir says, describing the sandy bank of the meandering river that runs through Tula Toli. He saw the killings unfold from a hill.
"When they saw people gathering, they went straight for them. They were shooting continuously, at the same time the houses were burning.

Cellphone footage shows Tula Toli residents heading to the river in their village on August 30, where witnesses say many were shot later that day.

Another resident, Rehana Begum, said she was also told to leave her home and stay near the river.

"They kept us there by saying that they would do us no harm," Begum says. "At 8 a.m., a helicopter landed and the village was besieged. Whoever was able to flee, they fled."

"(The military) surrounded us suddenly and we could not escape because of the river. The tide was high. There were no boats. Since my brothers could carry my children, I was able to swim and flee," she says.

"Many were shot, scores got hit and they fell on their face," Rehana said. "Those lying on the ground were picked up, chopped and later they were thrown into the river."

Hasina, a Rohingya woman from Tula Toli, says the soldiers and their accomplices threw her one-year-old daughter Sohaifa on a fire while she was still alive.

"They tore her from my arms," Hasina says, breaking down into tears. "They threw her into a burning pile of clothes. They had started a fire using people's belongings. And they threw her into the big burning pile."

Her husband had been working outside the village when the killings took place and later reunited with his wife in Bangladesh, where he found out about the death of their only child.

CNN cannot verify the accounts of the refugees, as access to Rakhine State is heavily restricted.

More than a week before the attack on the village, Rohingya village officials say there was a meeting on August 18, in which both Rakhine Buddhists and Rohingya Muslims from Tula Toli signed a peace agreement.

While the village, which is home to 4,360 Rohingya and 435 Rakhines, hadn't seen any clashes in recent years, Rakhine officials said they wanted to allay Rohingya fears given tensions between the two groups elsewhere in the state and a recent military build up, the survivors told Rahman.

"A resolution was passed to not attack each other and live peacefully. It was signed by both sides, Rakhine and us," said Nur Kabir, the current secretary of Tula Toli's village administration, who is now in Bangladesh.

"But they attacked on Wednesday starting at 8 a.m. and killed us."

The survivors say their trust in that peace agreement signed days before, and in the village authorities, was obliterated when the military arrived early on the morning of August 30. Those who escaped estimate that between 1,500 to 1,700 people died that day.

Rahman believes, given the instructions of local officials, the peace deal and the military build-up in the area before August 25, that the attack on Tula Toli was pre-planned. He calls it a "terrifying and inescapable notion" that undermines the repeated insistence from Myanmar authorities that the military were responding to attacks from Rohinya insurgents.

Zaw Htay, the spokesperson for Myanmar's de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi, said that local Rakhines and the military had been targeted by insurgents in Tula Toli.

"We could verify that on 30 August 2017 in Min Gyi (Tular Tuli) village, there were a total of eight attacks against Rakhine population and security forces by hundreds of terrorists," Zaw Htay said.

Previously, Myanmar's government has denied charges of ethnic cleansing, saying that the military took "full measures to avoid collateral damage and the harming of innocent civilians" in Rakhine State.

In a televised speech on September 19, Suu Kyi, a Nobel peace prize laureate who took power in 2015 in a power-sharing agreement with the military, said she "condemned all human rights violations," but failed to address alleged atrocities by the military.

She now faces increased scrutiny ahead of the visit of the US Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, on Wednesday, who has said he is "extraordinarily concerned about the situation."

Pope Francis, who has spoken out repeatedly in defense of the Rohingya, will also meet with Suu Kyi during a visit to Myanmar and Bangladesh later in November.

Seven-year-old Razia, who helped her mother Mumtaz to escape from Tula Toli. The rest of the family were killed in front of them. She suffered head injuries when her village was attacked. 

Seven-year-old Razia, who helped her mother Mumtaz to escape from Tula Toli. The rest of the family were killed in front of them. She suffered head injuries when her village was attacked.

Mumtaz is slowly recovering from her burns and other injuries in Bangladesh, but faces a desperate future.

Conditions in the border camps are bleak, with aid agencies struggling to provide enough food, shelter and healthcare in what the UN has described as the world's fastest growing refugee crisis and a major humanitarian emergency.

She and Razia now have only each other. In the carnage, Mumtaz says her husband was shot by the riverside. One of her three sons was thrown into a fire. The other two were killed in the wooden hut that Razia and Mumtaz escaped from.

"My brother and the others were burnt," Razia says. "They were killed by being smashed. They shot dead my dad."

Razia's head is scarred with the blows she received. But worse is the mental trauma of the memories, which are still raw.

"She saw. The little girl saw everything," Mumtaz says. "She tried to pick up her brother as he was burning. She couldn't."

By Rebecca Wright, CNN

ROHINGYA MASSACRE


Image result for rohingya children burned alive

Saturday, November 18, 2017

HUNTERS - PEOPLE WHO KILL ANIMALS FOR "SPORT" ARE SEXUAL PERVERTS


Pierce Brosnan

"How someone could want to shoot such an intelligent, empathetic animal as an elephant is beyond me...but what is most concerning for elephants is that renewed imports of trophy ivory into the United States might undermine the all-important ivory trade bans put in place by America and China."

Frank Pope, CEO Save The Elephants @savetheelephants


PEOPLE WHO KILL ANIMALS FOR "SPORT" OR PROFIT ARE SEXUAL PERVERTS WHO ARE UNABLE TO ENJOY NORMAL, LOVING RELATIONSHIPS. THEY GET THEIR PLEASURE FROM CAUSING SUFFERING, SHEDDING BLOOD, HEARING THE DEATH AGONY OF THEIR VICTIM.

TODAY A CAT, TOMORROW AN ELEPHANT AND SOON A CLASSROOM FULL OF CHILDREN. BUT ANIMALS ARE EASIER FOR THEM BECAUSE, WHEN THEY KILL CHILDREN, PEOPLE GET MAD AT THEM.

WHAT SHALL WE WEAR ON DOOMSDAY?


Blazing fireball lights up Arctic sky over Finland
 
The Associated Press 
Saturday, November 18, 2017 
COPENHAGEN - A blazing fireball lit up the dark skies of Arctic Finland for five seconds, giving off what scientists said was "the glow of 100 full moons" and igniting hurried attempts to find the reported meteorite.
Finnish experts were scrambling to calculate its trajectory and find where it landed, according to Tomas Kohout of the University of Helsinki's physics department, who said Thursday night's fireball "seems to have been one of the brightest ones."
It produced a blast wave that felt like an explosion about 6:40 p.m. and could also be seen in northern Norway and in Russia's Kola peninsula, he told The Associated Press on Saturday.
It might have weighed about 100 kilograms (220 pounds), according to Nikolai Kruglikov of Yekaterinburg's Urals Federal University.
"We believe it didn't disintegrate but reached a remote corner of Finland," Kohout said, adding that any search plans for the meteorite must face the fact that "right now we don't have much daylight" -- four hours, to be precise.
The Norwegian meteorite network said the fireball "had the glow of 100 full moons" and likely was going northeast, perhaps "to the Norwegian peninsula of Varanger," north of where the borders of Russia, Finland and Norway meet.
Kohout said scientists looked forward to any space debris they can get their hands on.
"We are happy to recover (it) since this is a unique opportunity to get otherwise inaccessible space material," said Kohout. "This is why it's worth it to search for them."
Viktor Troshenkov of the Russian Academy of Sciences told the Tass news agency that the fireball could be part of a prolific meteor shower known as the Leonids, which peaks at this time of year. He said he felt Thursday's fireball likely wasn't the sole meteorite but others maybe were not seen due to thick clouds elsewhere.
Troshenkov told Tass that meteor showers can be even stronger. The Leonids reach their maximum once every 33 years -- and the last time that happened was in 1998, he said. Amateur astronomers in the Arctic then saw about 1,000 meteors, 40 meteorites and one fireball in just one night.
In 2013, a meteorite streaked across the Russian sky and exploded over the Ural Mountains with the power of an atomic bomb, its sonic blasts shattering countless windows and injuring about 1,100 people. Many were cut by flying glass as they flocked to windows, curious about what had produced such a blinding flash of light.
The 2013 Chelyabinsk meteorite was estimated to be about 10 tons when it entered the Earth's atmosphere at a hypersonic speed of at least 54,000 kph (33,000 mph). It shattered into pieces about 30-50 kilometres (18-32 miles) above the ground but some meteorite chunks were found in a Russian lake.
A meteoroid is smaller than a kilometre (0.62 mile), and often so small that when it enters the Earth's atmosphere it vaporizes and never reaches the ground. A meteor is a flash of light caused by a meteoroid that fails to get through the Earth's atmosphere. If part of it does survive, that's called a meteorite.
Asteroids are generally larger chunks of rock that come from the asteroid belt located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.


ME TOO. IT WASN'T RAPE, BUT ...


SO MANY WOMEN ARE COMING FORWARD TO REPORT RAPE. MY CASE ISN'T RAPE, BUT THE ABUSE I EXPERIENCED STILL COMES BACK TO ME FROM TIME TO TIME, AND IT STILL BOTHERS ME.

I WAS A PATIENT OF DR.STEPHEN JACOBSON, UROLOGIST, AT THE JEWISH GENERAL HOSPITAL IN MONTREAL OVER A PERIOD OF YEARS.

IT WAS ALWAYS ORDINARY. INFECTIONS THAT HAPPEN FROM TIME TO TIME. THE EXAMINATIONS WERE ALWAYS A DIFFICULT EXPERIENCE FOR ME - AS I AM QUITE SURE THEY ARE FOR MOST WOMEN - BUT, ON THIS OCCASION, SOMETHING WAS VERY WRONG.

THERE I WAS, LAID OUT IN THAT MOST EMBARRASSING OF POSITIONS WHEN, SUDDENLY, WITH NO WARNING AT ALL, I WAS SURROUNDED BY A GROUP OF ASPIRING DOCTORS.

DR. JACOBSON HAD INVITED HIS STUDENTS IN FOR THE INSPECTION OF MY PRIVATE PARTS WITHOUT EVER ASKING MY PERMISSION. 

NO ONE BUT DR. JACOBSON TOUCHED ME. THERE WAS NO INAPPROPRIATE ACT. BUT THE MEMORY OF THAT GROUP OF DOCTORS LOOKING INTO MY PRIVATE PARTS STILL MAKES ME ANGRY. AND NOW THAT WOMEN ARE SPEAKING OUT, ADD MY NAME - ME TOO.

THE ROYALS - I REMEMBER ELIZABETH AND PHILLIP IN MONTREAL


The Royal Family

To mark the 70th Wedding Anniversary of Her Majesty The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh, new photographic portraits have been released worldwide. 

Today marks The Queen's #SapphireJubilee

It has been 65 years since Her Majesty acceded to the throne.

On 6 February 1952, King George VI sadly died following a prolonged illness. Princess Elizabeth immediately acceded to the throne, becoming Queen Elizabeth II and taking on all of the responsibilities which came with her new title.

In the photograph, The Queen is wearing a suite of sapphire jewellery given to her by King George VI as a wedding gift in 1947.

Find out more about The Queen's accession and coronation on our website: http://bit.ly/24irGhZers

Phyllis Carter -  I SAW THE QUEEN WHEN SHE WAS STILL PRINCESS. SHE AND PRINCE PHILLIP WERE IN MONTREAL STAYING AT THE WINDSOR HOTEL WHICH WAS JUST ONE BLOCK AWAY FROM MY FAMILY'S INTERNATIONAL NEWSPAPER STORE, METROPOLITAN NEWS AT 1248 PEEL STREET. 

HUGE CROWDS WOULD ASSEMBLE ACROSS THE STREET FROM THE HOTEL WAITING TO SEE THE ROYAL COUPLE COME OUT AND ASCEND INTO THEIR HORSE DRAWN CARRIAGE. 

I WAS A YOUNG GIRL, TEN YEARS YOUNGER THAN ELIZABETH. AT THE TIMES THE ROYALS WERE SCHEDULED TO EMERGE FROM THE HOTEL EACH DAY, I WOULD RUN TO THE PARK AND STAND ON THE CURB IN FRONT OF THE CROWDS TO GET THE BEST VIEW. 

I DIDN'T KNOW AT THE TIME THAT CLIFF - WHO WOULD BE MY HUSBAND DECADES LATER - HAD PLAYED FOR THE COUPLE WHILE THEY WERE IN MONTREAL. ELIZABETH REQUESTED A LOVE SONG FOR PHILLIP - "YOU'RE MY EVERYTHING". I STILL SING IT IN MY HEART FOR MY CLIFF.

http://cliffcartermrnostalgia.blogspot.com.

CHINA - THOUSANDS OF SOULS BOILED ALIVE, ROASTED, HUNG, SLASHED

Image result for PHOTO CHINESE SLAUGHTER DOGS

BOILED ALIVE IN CHINA

THIS IS A NIGHTMARE OUT OF HELL. AMERICA IS TIED UP WITH CHINA LIKE A "SIAMESE TWIN". MOST PEOPLE KNOW NOTHING ABOUT THE ATROCITIES THE CHINESE ARE COMMITTING. THE COMMERCIAL MEDIA NEVER MENTIONS THESE ATROCITIES. SEE FOR YOURSELF. THE AGONY IS BEYOND WORDS.

https://www.google.ca/search?q=PHOTO+CHINESE+SLAUGHTER+DOGS&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiB46eQ7sjXAhXqg1QKHSkxDPgQ7AkIMw&biw=1024&bih=473